Category Archives: Book Lists 2015

Alan Mattli: My 2015 in Books

Buchhaim

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Alan Mattli.

After reading 40 books in 2014, I’ve decided to try to go for 50 in 2015 – and, thanks in no small part to participating in the “7 in 7 Readathon” and Penguin Books launching their lovely series of “Little Black” classics”, I was actually able to achieve that goal, even if I secretly hoped to read beyond the number I set myself. But there’s always next year. With this year now over and roughly 11,500 pages read (thank you, Goodreads), it’s time to look back at my very favourite reads among those 50. Five of those excellent books, ordered by author names, I will comment on in a bit more detail.

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Fabia Morger: What I Read (and Liked) in 2015

Bookshelf

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Fabia Morger.

2015 has been a rather weird book year. While the first semester was stuffed with literature due to me taking the reading list exam, the second half of the year was relatively book-empty, at least for my standards. I really had a hard time remembering enough books to make a decent list, which is kind of depressing to know. Besides, I did a lot of re-reading, which feels important to me, a bit like visiting old friends. Some of those on the list are therefore not new to me, but I rediscovered and revisited them in 2015. I listed them in the order in which I think I have read them.

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Stephanie Heeb: My Top Five Reads in 2015

Bookshelf Read

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Stephanie Heeb.

Another year past, so the time has come to think about my favourite books I’ve read in 2015. According to Goodreads, I’ve read 32 books this year (so far), which is a fair average for me. What is more surprising is that my choices were somewhat unusual compared to what I normally read: I’m usually the kind of girl that alternates between something they would assign you to read at university and what I call my guilty pleasure, usually chick-lit romances. But this year I branched out and read short story collections and even non-fiction books, all of which I enjoyed. So without further ado, here are my top five books of 2015.

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Cheyenne La Marr: A 2015 Reading List

Bookshelf La Marr 1

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Cheyenne La Marr.

So I’ve set myself the goal of reading 50 books in 2015. Now, shortly before Christmas, I’ve read 68. Some for my English studies, some for my Scandinavian studies, some for fun and some for my job (at a bookstore). Some were amazing and made me recommend them to all of my friends and family (The Secret History, The Martian), some were really difficult to get through (Tristram Shandy), and some were just… blah. But here are the best of the best:

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Michael Simpson: 5 Comics and Graphic Novels

Comcis Shelf

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Michael Simpson.

This year comic anthologies and graphic novels were a wonderful antidote to some of the heavier theory of my master thesis (and heavier moments in life in general!) Here are my 5 recommendations, as well as a bit of my own personal rambling on the joys of queer comics.

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Raph al Guul: A Year of DeLillo

Don DeLillo

This post is part of a series of posts in which students of the English Seminar present their favourite books they have read in 2015. The lists are not restricted to books that were published this year. If you want to participate as well, send your list to zest.editor@gmail.com.

Today’s list comes to you from Raph al Guul.

I spent this year reading critical texts and novels by Don DeLillo almost exclusively in order to develop and write my master thesis on the subject of endings in DeLillo. During that time, not unexpectedly, I encountered people wanting to know what my thesis was, but usually I had a hard time explaining myself because they were unfamiliar with DeLillo. I was surprised to learn that even many students of English literature would respond to the above description with a blank stare. I don’t want to make hyperbolic claims concerning the author’s relevance to the state of present-day literature, so I’ll simply say that Don DeLillo is my favorite novelist (he shares this title with the very different, but nonetheless amazing Michael Crichton) and that it is a crying shame that even among colleagues you hardly ever get to discuss this particular author’s work.  So if you want to do me a favor, go out and get yourself some DeLillo; I’ll make it easy for you and give you five recommendations below. These are all more recent titles and I have listed them here in order of relevance to my master thesis and, consequently, as well as in the spirit of this series, in order of how much time I spent with the novel in the past year.

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